top of page

Overcome Egg Prices: The Benefits of Raising Chickens

The idea of having a backyard flock of chickens is becoming more and more popular, especially in light of recent events that have highlighted the fragility of our food supply chain.

High Egg Prices Pic

With the sudden increase in egg prices and the ongoing food shortages, many people are looking for ways to produce their own food and reduce their dependence on the centralized food industry. Keeping backyard chickens offers several benefits, including a fresh source of eggs and the opportunity to take control of the food you eat.


Benefits of Raising Chickens


Raising chickens has become increasingly popular, especially in light of recent events that have highlighted the fragility of our food supply chain and the drastic increase in egg prices. Keeping a backyard flock of chickens offers several benefits that make it a worthwhile investment for anyone looking to secure their food supply and reduce their dependence on the centralized food industry.

Fresh Organic Eggs: One of the key benefits of raising chickens is the availability of fresh, organic eggs. Store-bought eggs often sit on shelves for weeks or even months before they are purchased, leading to a decline in taste and quality. With backyard chickens, you have access to eggs that are laid daily and are always fresh. Moreover, since you have control over the feed and environment, you can choose to provide your chickens with organic, non-GMO feed, and raise them in a stress-free environment, which results in healthier and tastier eggs. By raising your own chickens, you can ensure that your eggs are organic and free from harmful chemicals, making them a more nutritious option compared to store-bought eggs.

Food Security: Another benefit of raising chickens is the reduced dependence on the centralized food industry. With the recent supply chain disruptions, many people have become worried about their ability to access food. Keeping chickens allows you to have a backup source of food in case of an emergency, giving you peace of mind and the assurance that you will have a steady decentralized food supply, no matter what the future holds.

Lower Cost: Raising chickens can also be cost-effective in the long run. While there are initial costs involved in building a coop and purchasing the chickens, once your flock is established, the cost of maintaining them is relatively low. The cost of feed and bedding is minimal, and the eggs they produce can save you money in the long run, especially compared to the high cost of eggs at the grocery store.

Opportunity to Connect with Nature: Keeping chickens also provides the opportunity to connect with nature and appreciate the simple things in life. It can be a great family activity that teaches children about where their food comes from, the importance of caring for animals, and the responsibilities of running a small farm. Raising chickens can be a fun and rewarding hobby that brings joy and fulfillment to those who engage in it.


Building a Chicken Coop


Before you start raising chickens, you'll need to build a coop to house them. There are several important things to consider when building a coop, including size, location, materials, ventilation, lighting, and security.

The size of the coop should be determined by the number of chickens you plan to keep. It should be large enough to provide ample space for your chickens to move around, but not so large that it takes up too much of your yard. The location of the coop should be in a place that provides enough sunlight and is protected from the wind.

When it comes to materials, you can use anything from wood to metal to build your coop. The most important thing is to make sure it is well-ventilated to keep your chickens healthy. The coop should also have roosts and nests for the chickens to sleep in and lay their eggs. Adequate lighting is important to provide a comfortable environment for your chickens. Finally, make sure the coop is secure to keep your chickens safe from predators.

For those living in urban areas, raising backyard chickens can seem like a daunting task, but with a bit of creativity and some handy building skills, it can be done. One option for city dwellers is to build a coop on top of a building, such as a rooftop or balcony, making the most of limited outdoor space. However, building coops on top of buildings can also come with its own set of challenges, such as weight restrictions and weather exposure, so be sure to check with your local government and building codes before starting the project. Another option for urban dwellers is to participate in an egg co-op, where a group of people share the responsibilities and costs of raising chickens. Egg co-ops can be a great way to experience the benefits of backyard chickens without having to deal with the challenges of building a coop and caring for the chickens on your own. Regardless of whether you choose to build a coop or participate in an egg co-op, raising chickens in urban areas can provide you with fresh, organic eggs and the opportunity to take control of the food you eat.


Raising Chickens


Choosing the Right Breed When it comes to raising chickens, choosing the right breed is crucial. Different breeds have different egg production rates, hardiness, and temperaments, so it's important to consider these factors when making your decision. Some popular breeds for backyard chicken raising include: Leghorn, Rhode Island Red, Plymouth Rock, and Sussex.

  • Leghorn: This breed is known for its high egg production, with hens laying up to 280 eggs per year. They are also small in size, making them a great choice for smaller flocks.

  • Rhode Island Red: This breed is a hardy, dual-purpose chicken that is excellent for both meat and egg production. They are known for their high egg production, with hens laying up to 260 eggs per year.

  • Plymouth Rock: This is a friendly and docile breed that is well-suited to backyard flocks. They are good layers, producing up to 280 eggs per year, and are known for their good feed-conversion ratio.

  • Sussex: This breed is another great choice for backyard flocks, with hens laying up to 250 eggs per year. They are hardy and friendly, making them easy to care for.


When choosing a breed for egg production, it is important to consider factors like egg production, hardiness, and temperament. By carefully choosing the right breed, you can ensure that your flock is productive and healthy.


Once you have your chickens, it's important to provide them with proper care and maintenance. Chickens need a safe and comfortable living environment, a balanced diet, and regular veterinary check-ups. You should also be prepared to handle routine tasks like cleaning the coop and collecting eggs.

Raising chickens can be a great way to have a reliable source of eggs, but it's important to consider local regulations, especially in urban areas. Some cities and towns have specific laws and guidelines for backyard chicken keeping, so be sure to check with your local government before setting up your coop.


Conclusion


Raising chickens offers many benefits, including a constant supply of fresh eggs, reduced dependence on the centralized food industry, and the opportunity to take control of the food you eat. Building a coop can be a fun and rewarding project, and raising chickens is relatively easy once you have the right setup. With the recent increase in egg prices and food shortages, it's more important than ever to consider decentralizing your food production.

By keeping backyard chickens, you can secure your food supply and have access to fresh, healthy eggs every day. Whether you're new to the world of backyard chickens or an experienced farmer, there's never been a better time to start your own flock.


 

Diversify your self-sufficient lifestyle by adding building a chicken coop and raising chickens for fresh eggs. Take it one step further and boost your emergency food supply with these top-rated companies.


**NomadPrep contains affiliate links and will be compensated for purchases made after clicking these links.



Comments


Commenting has been turned off.
bottom of page